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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 350

Resilience related to novel coronavirus among doctors and undergraduate medical students-A study from India


1 Department of Psychiatry, Bhagwan Mahavir Institute of Medical Sciences (BMIMS) (Formerly known as Vardhaman Institute of Medical Sciences, VIMS), Pawapuri, Nalanda, Bihar, India
2 Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Deoghar, Jharkhand, India
3 Department of Medicine, Bhagwan Mahavir Institute of Medical Sciences (BMIMS), Pawapuri, Nalanda, Bihar, India (Formerly known as Vardhaman Institute of Medical Sciences, VIMS), India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amardeep Kumar
Department of Psychiatry, Bhagwan Mahavir Institute of Medical Sciences (BMIMS) (Formerly known as Vardhaman Institute of Medical Sciences, VIMS), Pawapuri, Nalanda, Bihar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_60_22

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BACKGROUND: There are no studies pertaining to resilience related to novel coronavirus focusing primarily on doctors and undergraduate medical students in India. The objectives of this survey were to assess the resilience and its various domains that are needed for dealing with novel coronavirus among doctors, interns, and undergraduate students and to see its correlation with various sociodemographic factors. MATERIALS AND METHOD: An online cross-sectional survey was done among doctors and undergraduate medical students during the first COVID-19 wave from May 19, 2020 to June 8, 2020. A total of 434 responses were recorded during the study period. All the recorded full responses were considered for data analysis. Snowball sampling was used for this study. Resilience was assessed using three items, which were taken from the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS). RESULT: Out of 434 responses, 51.7% (224/433) of the respondents were non-resilient. The presence of the elderly at home was significantly associated with poor resilience (P = 0.02). Resilience was not significantly associated with other socio-demographic factors. Younger respondents (P = 0.019) and females (P =0.0004) were of the opinion that they recovered late from stressful events. Elderly respondents (P = 0.003) and those with chronic illness (P = 0.008) reported that it is hard for them to snap back if something bad happens (P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the doctors and undergraduate medical students were found to be non-resilient, underscoring the urgent need to take steps to improve the resilience of this group of frontline workers.


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